A Rotating Tiny House by Path Architecture. Portland Oregon

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Similar to a sunflower, The 359 is a home that rotates to follow the sun.
Designed by Portland-based architecture firm, Path Architecture, the home sits on a base that allows the home to be manually rotated to face (or face away from) the sun. An energy-efficient design that would allow you to either warm or cool your home naturally.
The home measures 12′ x 12′ with 144-square-feet on the ground floor and about another 120 on the top floor for a grand total of around 264 sq ft .  The 359 comes equipped with a fully functional kitchen, living/dining room area, bedroom, and a full bathroom.
via architecturepath.com

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Art Galery of Ontario Frank Gehry's Redesign

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It is fitting that the 70-year-old Frank Gehry ended up re-envisioning the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) for his native city of Toronto. As a boy, Gehry visited the AGO often, and the effect of those visits on him and his future career was important. Gehry has lived most of his life in the U.S., but the AGO remake allows Toronto to reap some of the benefits of his massive talent before it’s all too late.
One of Gehry’s early sources of career inspiration was the Finnish architect Alvar Aalto (1898-1976), known as the father of Scandinavian modernism. The influence of Aalto’s love of gently curving light-color wood, and his clean and airy architectural lines, can be sensed at the newly refurbished AGO. Whether or not Gehry thought of Aalto when he designed the spiraling plywood-faced staircase for the main entry hall is irrelevant, but the feel of the space is decidedly Aalto-esque. To those of us who love the work of both architects, the newly transfigured AGO is simply fabulous.
via ago.net

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Movable Camping Cabins by Olson Kundig. Seattle, US

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The Rolling Huts located in Mazama, Washington in Methow Valley were constructed to serve as modern form of camping. Designed by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects in Seattle, these environmentally-friendly huts sit lightly on the meadow, with wheels lifting the structures above the site.
Each hut is simple with 200 sq. ft. of interior space, and is equipped with a small fridge, microwave and fireplace. The 240 sq. ft. covered deck which surrounds the hut provides additional outdoor living space.
The materials used for the exteriors such as steel, plywood and car decking are durable and low maintenance.
via olsonkundig.com

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Two Hulls House by MLS Architects. Nova Scotia, Canada

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This project is situated in a glaciated, coastal landscape, with a cool maritime climate. The geomorphology of the site consists of granite bedrock and boulder till, creating pristine white sand beaches, and turquoise waters. The two pavilions float above the shoreline like two ship’s hulls up on cradles for the winter, forming protected outdoor places both between and under them.
This is a landscape-viewing instrument; like a pair of binoculars, first looking out to sea. A third transverse ‘eye’ looks down the coastline, and forms a linking entry piece. A concrete seawall on the foreshore protects the house from rogue waves.

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Hut on Sleds by Crosson Architects Whangapoua, New Zealand

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On the shore of an idyllic white sanded beach in New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula rests an elegant hut. Closed up, the rough macrocarpa-cladding blends into the landscape and perches quietly on the dunes, as passersby wonder how it could possibly function for a family of five.
Designed to close up against the elements, the hut measures a mere 40 square metres and rests on two thick wooden sleds that allow it to be shifted around the beach front section. This innovative portability is a response to the ever changing landscape that line the beachfront in this coastal erosion zone.
Within the hut, the ingenuity reveals itself further as no nook or cranny is overlooked. Every available space has been utilised, right down to the secret individual cubby holes hidden in the children’s bunk room.
For these clients it was all about the real essence of the hut; small, simple and functional. The hut comes to life when the enormous shutter on the northeast facade winches open to form an awning, revealing two-storey high steel-framed glass doors that form the main entrance. The hut then transforms into a sun drenched haven, opening up to the views of the surf and the distant Mercury Islands.
The mezzanine bedroom is accessed by climbing a wall-mounted ladder through a closeable hatch, it shares the same view as downstairs through the huge glass doors. Climb the ladder again and you arrive on a roof terrace which catches rainwater for the gravity tanks behind.
From the industrial style fittings to the quirky furnishings, this whole structure plays with the idea of the most egalitarian of Kiwi recreations and embraces and challenges the image of the traditional Kiwi bach. Small, simply and elegantly self-contained, this tiny elegant hut strips holiday living right back to basics.
via crosson.co.nz

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Diamond House by Formwerkz Architects. Singapore

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The house along Cove Drive in Sentosa sits on a slightly tapered site that faced a man-made lake. Built for a small family that greatly cherish their privacy, the house turns it back on the street and the sides where the neighbours are in close proximity. Like a monolith resting over the gardens, the single, faceted volume house the main spaces with their primary view to the waterway.The main entrance brings one into the centre of the house with the living and dining space on the sides. The upper floors are split in the middle into two volumes that house the daughter and the parent’s bedrooms.
The basement accommodate the guest room, entertainment, services and garage, lit and ventilated largely by the sunken courtyards.
The massing on grade is kept deliberately small to create more garden spaces within the tight site. The geometry is derived from negotiating with the planning parameters imposed on the neighborhood and the desire to simplify the building form. The front and side facades are pared down with openings strategically position to allow optimal daylighting with minimum compromise in privacy. The sloping walls at the corners allow for a smaller footprint while expanding the spatial volume at upper levels.

via formwerkz.com

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Casa Enseada by Arquitetura Nacional. Brazil

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The project was born from the request of a young family for a beach house to rest on the weekends and holidays. Xangri-lá is a famous destination for many people during the summer in southern Brazil. Therefore, as a vacation destiny, the project aimed the maximum integration between the family and their visitors.

Once the lot is located in a condo, no gates were necessary. This, combined with the nice view of a lake, drove the architects to make the most of the surrounding landscape. The creation of shaded and fluids open spaces was the solution adopted in this project.

As for the volumetry of the building, the choice was for pure materials with little interferences. The house has two main volumes made of different materials – wood and concrete. They are stacked, creating two large structural overhangings. Taking advantage of these shaded areas, the living spaces can be expanded according to the season. The connection between these volumes is made through the staircase, which is completely covered externally by greenery. The marble panels in the bedroom windows strengthens the upper concrete volume.
via arquiteturanacional.com.br

 

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Boat House by WE Architects in Denmark

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The boat house is located on the beach 20 metres from the water edge in the beautiful surroundings at Svallerup Strand, Denmark.
The boat house is aimed at being very simple and practical at the same time. Cedar wood is used for the construction due to its ability to withstand the elements and its fantastic silver grey patina. The boat house is build with no windows in order to keep the clean lines of the building intact.
The multifunctionality of the boat house is highly important. The client wants to use the house both to store boats, fishing gear, bikes, kayaks and tools – but also use it as a place where you can sit and enjoy the sunset and have guests staying there for the night. Thus, shelving and storage is built into the east facing wall.
Inside, the boat house is one open room with beams. Concrete is used for the floor with the possibility to cover it in sand, which makes it impossible to see where the building ends and the beach begins. The floor continues outside, which creates a terrace area to the west and south.
via we-a.dk

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Skyline Residence by Belzberg Architects Los Angeles, CA

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From architect:
Perched atop a ridgeline in the Hollywood Hills, the Skyline Residence represents an earnest approach to creating an environmentally sensitive building without sacrificing beauty or budget. We worked with the inherent physical and visual characteristics of this challenging site to reduce the architecture’s overall imposition on the landscape and create an exceptional experience for the residents.
The 5,800sqft residence comprises two buildings – the main house and the guest house – that are formally linked, but physically separated by an auto-court in between which doubles as a gathering space for social events and a viewing platform for projections onto the southern face of the latter. By activating this exterior space and encouraging interaction between the two houses, we maximized the value of the limited available space on site.
Due to the existing ridgeline of the property, the shape of workable land was generally long and narrow, abutted at both sides by steep, brush-covered hillside. The severity of the slope and dense granite stone beneath the surface also meant that in order to keep to budget, minimal excavation was done. As a result, our design forms a linear footprint with a single-loaded corridor on the west façade of the main house that acts as a heat buffer. Both buildings formally appear as a single, folded exterior surface matched with a screen of lapped Extira (a low formaldehyde-emitting composite lumber); these two materials also help manage heat gain from direct solar exposure. Meanwhile, floor-to-ceiling walls of low-e glass on the east-facing bedrooms provide the iconic and much sought after unobstructed views of downtown Los Angeles, Laurel Canyon and the San Fernando Valley.
via belzbergarchitects.com

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House in El Sesteo by Arkosis. Costa Rica

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The house intends to reflect the general spirit of the site as understood from its history, in this case it relates more to its origin as a “sesteo” than to its more ostentatious present.  A sesteo was the place where oxcart drivers would spend the night after a long journey; this name lingered on and was given to the current upper-middle class community.
Fantastic Realism allows the argument to be a real fact, to which “an illusory or fantastic ingredient” is added.  An imaginary archeology is the excuse to unearth ancient walls, traces of a possible past that will support the present-future of the house. These concrete walls are the monolithic base and the conceptual opposite of a collection of materials that show their industrial edges and assemblage, as a reference to the continuous bricolage that takes place in the majority of Costa Rican neighborhoods, here material progress means not only to acquire more appliances or cars, but also construction materials that are set on top of each other in apparent disorder, their individuality as single industrial pieces still readable… added space; alteration here means expansion most of the time. This procedure could be regarded as a meta language, not because it describes architectural language but because it precedes it. It also implies reducing the mediation of constructional lexicon and focusing on space as a direct consequence of the accumulation of materials.
via arkosis.com

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