Hawkesbury Manager's House by HMA. Central Otago, New Zealand

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Herriot + Melhuish Architecture worked in partnership with USA firm Marmol Radziner and Associates to develop a Californian Modernist style house redefined to sit in a Central Otago context.

The challenge was to adapt the traditional layered horizontal planes of the ‘modernist Californian pavilion’ to local planning rules and extreme weather conditions; and of course, take advantage of the spectacular views to the north of the site. Our client requested clever detailing to deliver cost effective solutions to these parameters.

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Mirrored Forest House in New York by Kieran Timberlake

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The site for this home is a south-facing, boulder-strewn escarpment that rises over a hundred feet, from a wetland to the top of a ridge. The owners were drawn to the almost magical sense of tranquility they felt upon their first visit to this heavily forested land, striped with loose-laid fieldstone farm walls from the nineteenth century. Their mandate to the architectural team was simple but not simplistic:they wanted to live in a “house in the woods, of the woods”—to feel the presence of the forest indoors—and to commune quietly with nature and visit with guests within naturally lit, open, airy, warm rooms.
The home is the culmination of a carefully crafted journey ascending the glacial terrain. The journey begins below the house as the entry drive wraps around a small pond that holds and filters water from the ridge above. The drive up to the home moves across the slope in curving arcs that work with the contour of the land. Ruins of farm walls and new stone-lined swales weave through the boulders and projecting bedrock ledges, managing the movement of water.
As the home spatially amplifies the power of physical passage across the terrain, so too do its walls expand and magnify the presence of the spectacular granite outcroppings mingled with the forest. Time of day, season of year, and variations in weather all shift and display in a perpetual dance ornamenting the walls.

via kierantimberlake.com

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Seascape Retreat by Pattersons. Banks Peninsula New Zealand

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A romantic beachside cottage is set into a rock escarpment in a tiny boulder strewn South Pacific cove. It is a shelter designed as a honeymoon retreat for paying guests consisting of just three rooms, a lobby, living/sleeping and a bathroom.
This retreat is built using all local materials and is constructed largely from rock quarried near its site with in-situ poured concrete floors and an earth turfed roof. The structure is integrated into the escarpment above to protect occupants from falling debris. The cottage is self-sustainable in respect to on-site water harvesting and wastewater treatment. The project incorporated an extensive reforestation and re-vegetation sub project.
Its plan is an interlocking geometry responding to both near views of the Bay and far views out to Rocky Spires.  It is lined with horizontal macrocarpa wood. This timber forms integrated joinery, wall and ceiling panels behind double glazed low e-glass in storm and shatter proof steel mullions which utilise earthquake resistant sliding heads.
via pattersons.com

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Clear Lake Cottage by MJMA. Parry Sound, Canada

IMG_1IMG_5 The Clear Lake Cottage proposes a simple tent-like envelope to house both program and outdoor spaces under a single vernacular form.  A singular roof presents a child-like impression of house; rectilinear and ordered in symmetry while playfully skewed in volume.  Nestled within a forest, the building is sculpted and stepped to take advantage of the land; modeling the natural grade. Open and closed faces respond to shoreline views or quiet wooded depths.  Like a tent the porosity of the building’s envelope strengthens the experience of ‘cottage’.
Three volumes: a communal space, a bedroom bar, and a master suite are registered in response to the site to achieve views, separation, and privacy.  The roof peak creates a sleeping loft, and enhances the communal space.  The plan aligns a series of large sliding windows for summer cross ventilation.   The tent-like ‘big top’ of the Douglas Fir interior has three exterior spaces carved into it to create sheltered outdoor areas.   The relationship to site, the transition spaces, and operable transparent skin connects to this privileged landscape.
via mjmarchitects.com

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Cabin Lille Aroya by Lund Hagem. Norway

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This charming cabin on stilts perched over an uneven rocky site in Norway is a holiday home for an interior architect, an artist and their two children. Oslo-based studio Lund Hagem designed Cabin Lille Arøya to be an extension of the majestic landscape.The 807-square-foot home is located on a small island off the coast of Helgeroa village in Southern Norway. Hidden from view, the house replaces an existing structure on a site exposed to strong winds. The architects designed two volumes connected by a decked walkway that widens to form a terrace.“The new volumes sit naturally with the existing landscape and allow for free circulation and use of surround areas,” said the architects. Cabin Lille Arøya is one of three island cabins recently designed by the architects.
all images Alexander Westberg 
via inhabit.com

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Retreat Home by Lund Hagem. Norway.

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There’s a house by the seaside in Norway – on the rocks. Nestled among the boulders of Sandefjord, on Norway’s south-east coast, Cabin Knapphullet by Lund Hagem was created as an annex to a summer home. But this gorgeous seaside retreat is a place you’ll never want to leave. Not quite 100 SF (30 meters), it has plenty of light and plenty of view and feels much, much larger. Surrounded by weather beaten boulders, the extreme privacy was part of the plan – despite it being a primarily glass house. And the stepped concrete roof? It leads to a viewing platform – concrete stairs to your private deck. Panoramic ocean views make it the perfect place for a sundown drink. Here’s to glorious sunsets on the Norwegian coast.
via trendir.com

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