House Between The Trees By Sebo Lichy Architects. Bratislava, Slovakia

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Steep terrain with three robust chestnut trees, which owners decided to preserve. This is how the property on which a unique family house was to be built looked at the beginning. Architects from Šebo Lichýˈs atelier took the challenge and designed a genuine construction inspired by famous Tugendhat villa.
The front part of the house is levitating on dynamic pillars and provides amazing panoramic views of the surrounding area. The back part of the house is plunging into the rising hill and is composed of several levels. When entering the house you find yourself in the middle floor, which is spacious and completely barrier free thanks to the extended part on the pillars. This floor belongs to parents with their bedroom, bathroom and workroom. There is also living room and kitchen, visually separated with the fireplace. Huge windows can be open to enable ventilation of the space. The floor above the children rooms with their own bathrooms and patios are situated. The floor below there is a basement with laundry room and home gym. A genuine invention represents the shaft for laundry, which delivers the clothes from discreet cover on the corridor right to the basement.
via sebolichy.sk

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Park Corner Barn by Mclaren Excell. Oxfordshire, UK

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et amongst beech-wooded farmland high in the Chiltern Hills, Park Corner Barn was originally part of the neighbouring farm estate and was used as an agricultural threshing and cattle barn until the   mid-1990s. Built in traditional brick and flint in the late eighteenth century, the barn was enlarged to twice its original size thanks to a Victorian addition in 1864- resulting in the building which stands today.
The first conversion of the barn in 1997 appeared to have been an exercise in squeezing as many rooms as possible within the building envelope over two floors, with a lower priority given to the rich material and spatial qualities of the building. The external treatment of the barn also made for a building with a lot of untapped potential.
The success of the project relied on undoing much of this previous work. A limited budget meant careful allocation of expenditure – some parts of the existing layout being left unchanged – but much of the building was taken back to the bare elements of the barn’s agricultural origins.
via mclarenexcell.com

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Irekua Anatani House by Broissin. Valle de Bravo, Mexico

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The name “Avandaro” comes from a Purépecha (a native language) word that means “place of the orchard” or “place in the clouds”. It was a territory originally inhabited by the tarasco indigenous people; who gave it this name, from whose language this house takes its alias, “Irekua”: Family house, and “Anatani”: to be under a tree: Irekua Anatani = Family house under the trees. Inspired by the land, which lies covered by showy trees, principally by oyamel trees, pine trees and encino trees, from the very first visit to the property we thought that the house had to enjoy the splendor of living under this density and be intrinsically a part of it by safeguarding most of the trees and the existing forest. This gave meaning to the architectural concept that took as a foundation platform a tranquil and partly open space in the middle of the mountain. The program was adapted to that topography, adjusting each space according to its use and function within the community of the whole house.
via broissin.com

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