A house with a rooftop infinity pool by Kois Associated Architects - Tinos Island, Greece

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Designed for the rocky terrain that makes up the island’s south-west coastline, the Mirage house is conceived by Kois Associated Architects as “an invisible oasis” where residents can enjoy panoramic views over the Aegean Sea without giving up their privacy.
The team decided to bury part of the building in the landscape and then create a large open-air living room in front. These will all be sheltered beneath the rooftop pool, which will act as a huge mirror to help the building camouflage with its surroundings.
Dry stone walls will surround sections of the interior and also frame the building’s entrance. These are designed to reference the traditional walls that can be spotted all over the scenic island landscape.
Patsiaouras explained: “The elements that stirred our imagination most were the linear drywall constructions that articulate the landscape and the scattered shallow concrete water-reservoirs used for agricultural purposes.”
via koisarchitecture.com

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Camp Baird by Malcom Davis Architecture. Sonoma County, California

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From Architect:
Active growing children and a central urban house on a steep slope led the owners of this compound to think farther afield when considering a weekend escape. They found an idyllic site an hour and a half from home on which to stretch their legs. The couple rehired architect Malcolm Davis, who designed their primary residence, to help them define their project and build a rural counterpoint to their full-time urban dwelling. The idea was to enclose the structure as little as possible to maintain the sense of a camp, a building completely focused on the outdoors. The client’s original inspiration images included tents pitched on a deck and a possible prefabricated structure. The images and informal flexible program struck a chord with Davis’s Northern California Regionalist background. Louis Mumford defined the style as “a native and humane form of modernism… a free yet unobtrusive expression of the terrain, the climate and the way of life” on the coast and in the coastal valleys of Northern California.

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Hudson Guesthouse by Janson Goldstein. Hudson, NY

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The master plan for this four-acre hillside site outside of the Upstate New York town of Hudson includes a new guesthouse and pool adjacent to an existing contemporary home. The 20-foot-by-45-foot pool takes advantage of the property’s Hudson Valley views, while the guesthouse, nearly surrounded by a new meadow, forms an entry court with the main structure. A covered breezeway divides the guesthouse into two sides, one a gym for the homeowners and guests, the other a living-and-sleeping area for guests. The opening acts as a bridge between the sides, allowing for privacy as well as connection to the surrounding landscape. Clad in vertical wooden slats, the structure’s simple construction, including exposed rafters and concrete flooring, features an elegant glass wall that maximizes the building’s transparency and views.
via jansongoldstein.com

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offSET Shed House by I Smith Architects. New Zealand

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A small family house located in the coastal community north of Gisborne.
From a context of accrued bach-esk dwellings in a south facing coastal surf community, a strategy of sequencing building sets (aka surf) was generated to scale new form to its surrounds. Building sets are then offset to allow seasonal living and circulation options for variations in wind and sun exposure.
Summer opens and invites in community; with diagonal movement connecting offset and shaded external spaces. Here living holds minimal interior use, with summer circulation defining informal house boundaries, and the control of sand.
Life then internalises for winter shut down, with high level openings capturing precious northern light and warmth, and offset forms providing shelter to the southern exposure.
via isarchitects.nz

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Villa SAH by Andrea Pelati. Switzerland

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The villa is located near the centre of Neuchâtel, Switzerland. It settles on a small plot surrounded by quite massive houses. Therefore, the house is concentrated in a compact volume, seeking for openings and light vertically. It develops over three levels, the highest and brightest of which are hosted the living room, dining room, kitchen and terrace.In respect to the occupants privacy, the North façade displays a shield to the street whereas the South façade opens on to beautiful framed views of the city, lake and Alps.The layout was designed to allow light to flow in through all three levels, thanks to high ceilings, over lapping spaces and skylights.Sleeping areas are set on the intermediate level focusing on intimacy, whereas the utility rooms lay on the ground floor, taking benefit of a direct access to the garden.

via: ap-architecte.ch

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